Walking the Fife Coastal Path

When I moved to Fife in 2014, I found that I was living only a few hundred yards from part of the Fife Coastal Path - an official long distance path covering a shade over 116 miles from Kincardine to Newburgh. Fife has been famously described (by James VI of Scotland) as a "beggar's mantle fringed with gold", and the path essentially traverses the whole of this golden fringe. I decided to set myself the goal of walking the path. Not all in the one go, not even in a contiguous group of days, but over a period of a year or two, as time, energy, and inclination allowed.

On this site I record the walks and share some of the many photographs taken. My site does not attempt to provide any directions or to act as a guide for others undertaking the walk - there are many good maps and guides available to do that, and the path is generally well sign-posted. Also, although there is no attempt to comprehensively review cafes along the way, I do mention where I have stopped for refreshments (and for me one of the good things about these walks is that there is almost always somewhere to get a decent coffee).

The coastal path is one I would recommend to other walkers - the scenery is varied, and although some parts of the path are away from the coast and sometimes a bit dull, there is always something worthwhile just around the corner

Introduction to walking the Fife Coastal Path
Walking from Kincardine to Inverkeithing on the Fife Coastal Path
Walking from Inverkeithing to Kirkcaldy on the Fife Coastal Path
Walking from Kirkcaldy to Elie on the Fife Coastal Path
Walking from Elie to Crail on the Fife Coastal Path
Walking from Crail to St Andrews on the Fife Coastal Path
Walking from St Andrews to the Tay Bridge on the Fife Coastal Path
Walking from the Tay Bridge to Newburgh on the Fife Coastal Path